Decryptopedia™

Our cryptocurrency glossary helps you decipher crypto jargon back into plain English. Learn the terms that you’ll come across on your crypto journey.

Term of the Day

Bitcoin Pizza Day

Bitcoin Pizza Day marks the day when the first known purchase of a physical good occurred using the first cryptocurrency, bitcoin (BTC).

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Topic of the Day

Technology

Cryptocurrencies aren't just about money. Cryptocurrencies are technology. At a foundational level, cryptocurrencies are all software - code - that runs on hardware - nodes -  across a vast...

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Terms that start with a number

  1. 1 Hour (1hr)

    In crypto trading, and charting specifically, 1 hour is a common time frame used by traders to review a digital asset’s price movements plotted in 60-minute intervals over some specific time period. Each bar, candle, or column would represent price action for a specific 1 hour.

  2. 1 Minute (1m)

    In crypto trading, the 1-minute time frame or chart is commonly used with scalping strategies to review a digital asset’s price movements plotted in 1-minute intervals over some specific time period. Each bar, candle, or column would represent price action for a specific 60 seconds

  3. 30 Days (30d)

    Cryptocurrency exchanges and charting platforms will use 30d to show you data from the last 30 days. Using charts or collecting data like historical price movements over a longer time frame offers deeper insight into an asset’s trend when compared to smaller sample sizes of data or shorter windows of time like daily or weekly.

  4. 30 Minute (30m)

    In crypto trading, and charting specifically, 30 Minutes is a common time frame used by traders to review a digital asset’s price movements plotted in 30-minute intervals over some specific time period. Each bar, candle, or column would represent price action for a specific 30 minutes

  5. 51% Attack

    Happens when the majority of the cryptocurrency network’s hash rate or validation authority is controlled by a single person or entity. Also known as a majority attack, malicious actors could use a 51% attack to cause disruption on the network, potentially overriding the consensus mechanism of the network.

Money can't buy you happiness but it does bring you a more pleasant form of misery.Spike Milligan